Monday, October 29, 2012

I'm a Witch, not a Wiccan - A brief summary of broad pagan designations


Current Modern Paganism - Venn diagram


I have commented before on the usefulness of designations in the neopagan community. Though we are generally self-directed with many being solitary and "eclectic", it is darn helpful to be able to declare certain predispositions, especially if one is interested in working with others. In joining an on-line group or planning a ritual, the use of categories can help determine if a great deal of negotiation, or only a little, is required to make your collaborations most satisfying.
 
One question often asked is the difference between designations in the neopagan community.  Of course, there are a vast variety of answers, and as a very dynamic and vibrant community, these answers may be quite altered in a decade.  However, there are some trends that seem to have settled out for the moment... 
 
Earth Religions or Earth-Centred Spirituality is currently the designation for all those traditions that are outside most of the major religions, i.e.Abrahamics, Buddhists, etc., but that also follow an Earth based path.  It usually encompasses folk traditions, like European peasant beliefs and practices, as well as native aboriginal spirituality.  However, not all followers of those traditions would choose to call themselves pagan, especially if they also practice some form of Abrahamic religion as well. So it's best to not to assume, which is why Paganism is a subset of Earth Religions.
 
Paganism, or Neopaganism, is the modern catch-all phrase for many organized and non-organized Earth based religions and spirituality. Often seen as based on European Aboriginal practices and beliefs, it can also be used to describe traditional African, Asian, and North American spirituality, though less so, largely due to its primarily English usage. By declaring oneself "pagan", it specifically implies a resurgence in traditional Earth Based beliefs, sometimes in defiance of Abrahamics, depending on the area, and a reconstruction of traditional wisdom, knowledge, and connection with Nature as a completion of self and humanity.  It can be Deity based, supernatural, or atheistic.
 
Witchcraft is a subset of Paganism.  Because of the etymology and use of the word itself, witchcraft usually means pre-Christian folk beliefs of Western and sometimes Eastern Europe.  As a modern practice, it has two main elements, either one of which may be included. It is both tribal and a religious choice. For most, it involves the preference of using magic as meditation, prayer, ritual and empowerment.  For a smaller group, they are born into families that are known for the "Gift", "Second Sight", or the "Eye", if you are less popular...  In the past in most places, children born into these families or who showed potential would often have been trained and dedicated to help their communities. A few of these families that survived the Abrahamic purgings retained the gifts and occasionally the training and traditions that went along with them, though most rejected them, usually out of real fear and concern for their safety if they weren't outright converted.  Like many reClaimed traditions, such as native spirituality, modern witchcraft is a combination of contemporary writings and current analysis of past traditions, as well as past and extant examples of country and folk rituals, and to a much smaller extent, of witch families and their practices.  Due to recent advances in cultural archeology, it is also undergoing the greatest updates and flux. Though most are not from family traditions, modern witches can follow the folk beliefs of the aboriginal Europeans, or practice magic, or both.  They can also refer to themselves as witches if they come from a witch family or have the traditional innate abilities, without practicing a folk religion or spellcraft.  Or any combination of the above, including practicing witchcraft in other traditions, like Abrahamics. (Jewitches.  Heh.) It's a pretty broad category, but my usual test is - anything that can get you burnt as a witch by fundies usually qualifies you to self-identify as a witch. Spellcraft, Goddess worship, foretelling, healing... But not that heretic stuff. That's totally different.
 
Due to its heavy reliance on magic and its European structure, Wicca is almost entirely a subset of Witchcraft, though there are a few practitioners who could be considered outside of it, such as high magicians. Wicca is a relatively new tradition, with its origins largely in the middle part of last century, with some of the structure extending back into the Victorian era.  Drawing on what was known at the time of folk history and tradition, it is a conglomeration of primarily European beliefs, but also reflects turn of the century Orientalism with elements of ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Asian references. Though slow to start, in the last few decades it has had hundreds of writers popularizing it, and has seen an explosion in individual sects.  Because of its very modern feel and adaptations while retaining an aura of Romanticism, Wicca is one of the largest and best known segments of Witchcraft and neopaganism, and one of the fastest growing religions in the world.

Wiccans are almost always witches, but witches aren't always Wiccan. Wiccan is not the 'politically correct' term for witch.  It's a sect of witchcraft, like Protestantism is for Christians.  They have certain specific beliefs and rituals that identify them as a group.  You wouldn't call all Christians Protestants, would you? Hence, the Venn diagram.  I hope that clears things up, especially for the well meaning but less knowledgeable. 
 
Heathenism is a collective category of paganism who follow the Old Religion and who will sometimes consider themselves Wiccan if they practice magic but usually don't identify as witches at all.  Primarily men, they can be of a more structured faith, like Druids, or more folk based, like Odinists. They often identify with warrior culture and value traditional knowledge, self-reliance, personal strength and honour.

This is a very brief sketch, of course, and some in the community will dispute these categories.  There are lots of others as well.  Wizards, or High Magic practitioners, for example, deal with the Other World and its denizens in a rigid, formalized manner, and so can be from nearly any religion, including Abrahamics.  From what our current literature refers to, these are the general starting points and what most persons will intend to convey when they use these terms.  Feel free to comment on the specifics or dispute below!